Windows 10 Impact on IT departments and how to eliminate costly migration issues for Enterprises

The Windows 10 feature set suggests many areas which may impact IT departments in the future. A recent survey found that 80% of large enterprises and 71% of businesses plan to migrate to the new OS in the next 18 months after release, suggesting that it will be even more popular than Windows 7, which still commands a very large market share, particularly in enterprises. This was probably too optimistic, but the vast majority of organization are preparing their migration.
Microsoft has made it also very clear that a major focus of Windows 10 is the business users:
•   Better usability via new, advanced Start Menu, better windows and desktop management (e.g. task viewer), seamless integration (windowing) of new “metro” apps, and so on.
•   Better/faster/more secure browsing experience (Edge)
•   Cross device familiarity and universal apps – this is very important for larger organizations. The ability to run and manage different form-factors with the same OS will accelerate mobile adoption in enterprise
•   Enterprise apps can be built “once” and deployed (optimized) for all devices (although it is not that easy) – all supported via a central, unified App Store.
•   Extended Mobile management
•   Voice Recognition – Smart Assistance: Cortana can be a change agent of how consumer interact with the desktop PC. Voice recognitions and machine learning will enable new and innovative scenarios
•   Lowering Cost of ownership
•   Security improvements / Support of two factor authentication
Windows 10 promises to deliver advanced security and management capabilities along with ongoing innovation and security updates for businesses of all sizes. These new capabilities will deliver a host of benefits to organizations, enabling them to make key enhancements across their IT landscape and maximize ROI.

The Impact on Migration
Windows 10 will be the next big migration for IT teams to undertake, and they need to adapt to this reality if they are to continue delivering a positive and consistent user experience across the corporation. There are a number of key issues to consider, such as:
•   The still existing base of machines running Windows XP (NT/Vista), adding to the complexity of deployed Windows 7 and 8/8.1 PCs.
•   More migrations will occur simultaneously, including software, applications and devices. This means less time for IT teams to prepare and test new upgrades, likely resulting in issues following the deployment.
•   Technical scenarios are these days are far more complex, with greater connectivity and interdependencies across systems and key applications.
•   Scenarios are now more complex largely because of a multitude of devices and new form factors. Many new devices are running operating systems like Android and Apple iOS, thus adding to the complexity.
With so many migrations now taking place in increasingly complex environments, desktop or end-user oriented IT teams run the risk of underestimating the time, complexity and overall project management involved. Further, the impact of post migration help-desk support must also be understood and accounted for.
The end result is that it is more difficult than ever to deliver effective management of policies and user privileges, while providing a positive user experience.

Understanding the Cost Issues
We have broken down the most common complaints and the mistakes organizations are making that result in unexpected costs.
1.   Many organizations underestimate the time end users spend to become familiarized with their new PC system, as well as problems with migrating existing user data, and settings recovery. This time can easily exceed three to four hours. These soft costs are often not part of IT budgets, but are of great concern for business owners experiencing employee-productivity drops.
2.   End user customizations are frequently not considered in the overall plan. Customization are mostly left for the employee to complete on company time. Customizations like reapplying and creating settings for the new desktop can be beyond a normal users’ comprehension, leading to a surge in PC helpdesk requests with associated cost of $50 or more per call.
3.   The third mistake is underestimating the logistics associated with PC migrations for users in remote locations and international subsidiaries, which can prove to be extremely difficult. The need to outsource to a contractor or flying a staff member to a site, causes deployment issues and costs to rise quickly.
4.   The fourth, and final, mistake occurs inadvertently when data and settings are left behind. In a recent study conducted with enterprise level IT departments, the results were troubling: 27% of respondents who used various tools for transferring data and settings reported data loss in the process.
The Market for PC Migration Solutions
Windows 10 will cause businesses and IT teams to increasingly respect the fact that end user computing is changing. What is happening in the OS market is comparable to the BYOD revolution that saw the number and variety of devices on the corporate network sky rocket. This has and still is raises a number of challenges in terms of control and management.
The PC, tablets, and other devices have evolved into very powerful systems. Because today, we have dozens of vital applications, several gigabytes of data, and thousands of settings in the Windows registry, reestablishing all that on a new PC is time-consuming and near impossible to streamlined for a company.
With new PC deployments on the forefront of many IT teams’ tasks, issues surrounding the fact that there are few tools at the enterprise level to successfully complete this endeavor. Proven solutions like PCmover® Enterprise are not always known within many IT Organizations.
Organizations need a solution with minimal interruption to employees’ productivity, save time and resources, and will seamlessly migrate files, folders, and applications vital to each employee’s daily workflow. An IT professional at one of the largest PC manufacturers once stated: “We are supporting thousands of large organizations to deploy their PCs. We do everything from logistics, imaging, tagging, and bringing the PC to the workplace. We do not, however, have a solution for the actual migration between two desktops.”
Laplink developed a simple view into the Enterprise Value Quadrant. The costs associated with the migration are rules by two factors: the way PCs are managed, and the physical location of the PCs. If PCs are managed solely by the IT department, users do not have admin rights, data and settings are stored on servers, and the PCs are centralized within one location, then the benefit from PCmover tends to be minimal. However, if the PCs are managed by the users and are decentralized, the benefit from PCmover is the highest.
Experience indicates, there is no large organization that will fit into any of these quadrants solely, but rather will have different departments or groups that are scattered over this matrix. It can be assumed that PCmover might not be the tool for every PC, but it is the tool for every organization. It is the perfect tool for a managed migration of un-managed desktops.

An Effective Enterprise Solution
Laplink developed PCmover® Enterprise to make the workstation migration process effective and cost-efficient. It automates the transfer of selected applications, data, and settings to a new PC. This including user accounts, applications’ environments, applications’ add-ons, background pictures, favorites, and more.
PCmover Enterprise is an OS-independent transfer tool that allows to migrate to the newest version of Windows, including Windows 10. All migration scenarios are supported, and it has been proven successful in migration projects ranging from 100 to 100,000 PCs.
PCmover Enterprise has an easy-to-use wizard that does not require any developer knowledge and enables the IT Administrator to set the rules. IT departments are able to predefine certain rules and policies within the organization to fit all cases.
The Policy Manager allows IT Administrators to pre-check a variety of choices within the program to create a predefined version of the product that can be executed by a user or an IT engineer with minimal interaction. The experienced user might require all options to be open to them, but most users in an organization may be better off with a no-touch or light-touch solution to minimize user errors.
PCmover Enterprise by Laplink Software is the solution for every organization that has over 100 PCs. It will save a minimum of $300 per PC deployed, eliminating the need for extended project cycles. Using PCmover helps organizations decrease unbudgeted costs during the projects, and dramatically decreases productivity loss.
No matter where you are in your deployments of new PCs or operating systems, PCmover® Enterprise will help make the process streamlined, cost-effective, and efficient.

Laplink Solves Hidden Dangers of Moving off Windows XP

Laplink and Microsoft partnered to offer PCmover Express for Windows XP to support PC migrations of data and settings from a Windows XP machine to a Windows 10 machine.

End of support for Windows XP occurred in April 2014. Windows XP users who chose to stay on the operating system after April faced an end to hot-fixes, technical assistance, and security updates. Remaining on Windows XP was risky; many reports pointed out that the lack of security updates would make it a big target for hackers, viruses, and other malware. When Microsoft released security updates for Windows 7 and 8, attackers checked and tested Windows XP for these same vulnerabilities. If the vulnerabilities were shared, it made it easy for a hacker to release malware into the target XP computer.

Studies suggest that Windows XP users are six times more likely to suffer from a virus or other malware. We highly recommend that XP users upgrade their current operating system or transfer to a new Windows 10 PC. Our flagship product, PCmover, helps users move into a new PC seamlessly, so there’s no reason to face the risks that Windows XP carries.

PCmover for Windows XP transfers all selected files and personalized settings from an old PC to a new PC. Its streamlined process handles everything automatically using a step-by-step wizard to guide the user through individual selections. Users can choose to transfer everything, or they can select which files, and settings to leave behind. PCmover handles the rest!

For users interested in migrating their applications, also, they should look at PCmover Professional. There’s no need to find old serial numbers, license codes, or installation disks because PCmover transfers most applications to the new PC installed and ready-to-use.


PCmover also comes with 24/7 Free Transfer Assistance. Users can simply call the toll-free number and receive expert guidance from a certified migration specialist. The migration specialist will walk any user through the complete transfer process, including setting up peripherals like printers, wireless internet, and more.

There is a hidden danger behind moving off of Windows XP that many PC users aren’t considering. Once a user leaves the old PC, what do they do with the data? Data that isn’t erased permanently can be retrieved, causing them to become victims of identity theft. Fortunately, we offer a solution for that too with SafeErase.

Research shows that identity theft is the fastest growing crime in America and affects approximately 19 people per minute. The average victim of identity theft suffers an estimated $500 and 30 hours to resolve the crime. Deleted data can be recovered; even when hard disks are formatted, data recovery software can be used to obtain personal confidential data. Laplink SafeErase protects users by permanently deleting data so that no one can retrieve and use it.

Laplink SafeErase is the fastest and most secure way to permanently delete sensitive information from an old PC before selling or recycling. Utilizing a series of government recommended deletion methods, SafeErase completely wipes personal data from the hard drive making it completely unrecoverable.  SafeErase is compatible with Windows 10, making it the perfect tool for those looking to move off Windows XP to a new Windows computer.

Full versions of PCmover can be purchased at for users interested in moving off Windows XP. Laplink SafeErase is available for $29.95 at

Your 7 Worst Tech Habits

As a professional in the software industry, I am just as guilty as many of you are of committing 7 of these worst tech habits. But together, we can learn to be better!

1. Leaving equipment in plain sight: This seems too simple to be a problem, but for a lot of us, those brief forgetful moments or short breaks to the bathroom at a coffee shop can result in a frustrating situation of theft. With the abundance of devices people own, it can be hard to remember that each one is worth hundreds of dollars. Beyond that, the information we now store on our mobile smartphones, tablets, and laptops that can be hacked into and stolen is frightening. This same sentiment goes to office workers using a desktop or laptop: at the end of the day, log out or shut down completely. Leaving your computer vulnerable and unlocked can result in data hacking or deletion which could jeopardize your job and company’s security.

 2. Oblivious gadget usage: It’s easy to point at the younger generations and mock them for having their cell phones glued to their palm at all times. Whether it’s at work, in the classroom, the dinner table: their mobile phones are never apart from their being. Yet, hard as it is to admit, many grown adults are also guilty of constant gadget use. And as much as we try to set a good example, sometimes we do end up texting while driving, or scanning Facebook instead of watching our kid score a soccer goal, and spending time on the computer at home instead of interacting with the other people under our roof. Time to change those habits.

3. Not cleaning your equipment: Our cell phones are in our hands, our pockets, our purses, and rubbing up against the sides of our face throughout the day. But how often do we actually clean that phone..? It probably has more bacteria colonies growing on it than a public restroom’s toilet. Another forgotten piece of equipment is your computer’s keyboard, at home or at work. Take a few minutes to use canned air can to blow out the crumbs, dust, and dirt between the keys. As is described in this PCWorld article: “Dust, dirt, hair, and other debris can build up on fans and heatsinks. Components can come loose or become unseated.” Basically your computer can go to dirt if you let too much dirt accumulate on it.

4. Sitting with bad posture at the computer: This is something everyone is guilty of, no doubt about it. Sure there’s some offices that have stand-up desks, treadmill desks, or exercise ball chairs, but for the rest of us, we just need to remember to sit with the screens at eye level, our wrists and arms straight over the keyboard (not bent, which can lead to carpal tunnel), and shoulders back. You can read more here.

5. Not taking breaks: I always take a lunch break at work, but beyond that, I sometimes forget to give myself breaks from my screen. Studies have shown that constant sitting is very damaging to your health. Try walking around for a couple minutes, standing and doing stretches—anything to break up a full day of sitting on your bottom is good for you! Take short 1-2 minutestretch breaks every 20-30 minutes. After each hour of work, take a break or change tasks for at least 5-10 minutes. Always try to get away from your computer during lunch breaks.

6. Reusing passwords over and over: In today’s world, there are so many online accounts to keep track of, it can be a lot easier to use the same password across multiple accounts. But as we’ve all seen in the news more and more, data hacking and identity thievery is becoming commonplace on the Internet. Two basic solutions for this problem are, first, to keep a spreadsheet to contain the necessary (user name, password, email, website, etc.) to keep organized. You can “Password Protect” this sheet, using a master password that you will never forget for as long as you live! The second solution a lot of people use is a one-stop-shop password application like 1Password or LastPass that gives users a safe way to have a “safe” full of personal data that you don’t want laying around the house or office.

SafeErase Right

Another tip from us is to regularly schedule deletions of your deleted data, temporary files, and Internet search history using Laplink’s SafeErase. It uses six government-level deletion methods to permanently erase your data so that it is unrecoverable, even if a hacker uses the most sophisticated recovery software. Your data will be gone.

7. Failing to back up data: This is another scenario where you don’t want to be caught unaware. While most of the time our computers are reliable, and our data is safe, it only takes one time to make the idea of losing everything on your PC a living nightmare. By being proactive about your backup habits, you can protect yourself against complete data loss. And with Windows 10’s release, you can also take an image of the entire PC’s contents, including the operating system, using Laplink’s DiskImage software. DiskImage makes a mirror copy of your PC’s data content, OS, and anything else you select, and saves it to an external disk. You can schedule regular back-ups to run in the background while you’re using your PC, and it will never tamper with your computer’s performance. But that way, you’ll always have the latest version of your computer’s personality and contents backed up to an external disk just in case.

DiskImage Left

This concludes our list of 7 bad tech habits, though there are plenty more we can think of! What are your bad tech habits? Share on Facebook and Twitter.

Series: 5 Tips for Software Developers (Part 3)

Jack Wilson, Laplink Software’s Chief Technology Officer, has 30 years of experience in a wide variety of software development projects and is a seasoned software developer. In the final post of this 3-part series, Jack expounds on his last two tips for software developers he would give to interested parties applying to work on his team.

TIP 4: Beware of getting “stuck” in one area

It’s certainly not bad being an “expert” in something, but if that’s all you know and that technology goes away–then what? I remember working on a long term Air Defense system that was mainly written in FORTRAN. The project got cancelled and all of us had to find new positions. The work I was doing was written in ‘C’ and on embedded processors. I had no problem finding a new position. The mainframe FORTRAN guys were not so lucky.

I am also probably one of maybe a handful of people who can say they helped write implementations of DecNet, Netware, and TCP/IP for embedded systems. (Right now, there is one gray-haired guy in a ponytail someplace reading this who is thinking “Cool dude” and the rest have no idea what I’m talking about.) But that brings up a point, besides new advances in hardware and technology, there are tons of things that have also gone obsolete. Ever see a punch card? What happened to all those AOL floppy disks that used to come in the mail? Engineers don’t often think about that.

TIP 5: Make your hobby your job.

The last thing you want to do is wake up in the morning thinking, “I don’t want to go to work.” The best job is the one where you can’t sleep at night because you want to get back at it. However, don’t become so obsessed that life passes you by. Stop worrying about money.

That concludes our series of tips for software developers! If you have anything you’d like to add, leave a comment on Laplink Software’s Facebook page!

Series: 5 Tips for Software Developers (Part 2)

Jack Wilson, Laplink Software’s Chief Technology Officer, has 30 years of experience in a wide variety of software development projects and is a seasoned software developer. He has extensive experience developing network devices and network-enabled applications. Jack’s professional skills were honed at leading companies, including Networks Northwest Inc., Boeing Defense and Space Group, and Westinghouse.

As the manager for the tech department at Laplink, Jack expounds on his 5 tips for software developers he would give to interested parties applying to work on his team. This is the second post of the series, so stay tuned for the last post.

TIP 2: Always think about what will make something better.

If you come up with something and you find out someone has already done it, then see if you can do it better. If no one has, then do it! There have been many companies that were started by someone who just found a better way of doing something, and they were the ones to succeed. The most fun I ever had in my career was working at a small startup; I was the fifth employee. We worked hard and created a great product. Unfortunately, we were unable to get our costs down to a competitive level and so the company ultimately failed. However, even though the company didn’t succeed, it was still a great time and a really great learning experience.

Having tunnel vision in your field can be debilitating for your future as a software developer. It’s always important to stay abreast of your competitive landscape from a product perspective. Because you want to make sure that your product is better than everyone else’s. Communicate regularly with your team’s project manager to better understand what your competition is doing, and see if you can’t make it better.

TIP 3: Software is not only limited to the PC, Mac, or tablet.

Software is now in everything and will keep growing immensely. Another misconception is that everything has a screen; more and more, screenless devices are part of the Internet of Things. My advice is to learn to do embedded software; it can be a real challenge. Pick up a Raspberry Pi or Arduino and play with it for a while just to see what you can learn. It will help you when you’re applying for software developer and programmer jobs.

But be wary whatever the new fad is. Engineers love to play with whatever is the new thing, which is okay as long as it is the right solution for the job. Otherwise, you are wasting time and money for your company, yourself.

Stay tuned for the final post in this series!

Series: 5 Tips for Software Developers

With the rapid evolution of technology, the demand for software developers and engineers is growing. Software has woven itself tightly into daily lives; programmers and developers have almost guaranteed job security.

The job outlook for software developers in 2012, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, is growing at a rate of 22%: faster than the average career. With an undergrad degree and computer programming skills, college grads are hired out of school earning a much higher starting salary than almost any other profession that does not require more than a BA.

But while this is an exciting time to study software development, young graduates and newcomers to the industry might lose sight of their goals, or get lost in the shiny haze of new opportunities that are coming at them as fast as technology is changing.

Jack Wilson, Laplink Software’s Chief Technology Officer, has 30 years of experience in a wide variety of software development projects from radar and air defense systems to commercial software. He is a seasoned software developer and has extensive experience developing network devices and network-enabled applications. Jack’s professional skills were honed at leading companies, including Networks Northwest Inc., Boeing Defense and Space Group, and Westinghouse.

As the manager for the tech department at Laplink, Jack expounds on his 5 tips for software developers he would give to interested parties applying to work on his team. This series will be broken into 3 posts, so stay tuned for the next two posts, also.

TIP 1: Don’t just get into something just because it’s the “in” thing.

Get into something that you can be truly passionate about. In the late 1990’s everyone who could spell “www” got jobs creating web pages. By 2001 most of them lost their jobs, except those who were passionate. They became even better. Something that has vastly advanced in the last 20 years is the Internet. I remember telling one of my engineers back in the early 1990s to go get this Mozilla browser thing and look into what this World Wide Web “thing” was all about. In those days, smaller companies had networks running Novell Netware. The really big companies networks ran Digital’s DecNet on mainframes. (Those networks don’t even exist anymore.) Companies connected offices to each other using state-of-the-art “modems” sending about 300 bits per second.

To give you an idea of how slow that is by current standards, my home Internet today is connected at 50 Mega-bits per second: it is 166,666 times faster than what we used in the nineties, and I still complain that the Internet is slow!

Laplink & Webroot Product Bundle

Laplink Software, Inc. announced today our partnership with Webroot to provide a software bundle to users purchasing a new Windows 10 PC this holiday season.
Webroot is the market leader in intelligent cybersecurity for endpoints and collective threat intelligence. In partnership with Laplink, the two companies will boost their consumer offerings by bundling Webroot SecureAnywhere® Internet Security with PCmover Express to make cybersecurity and new PC setup easy—just in time for the holiday shopping season.
PCmover Express moves files and settings from an old Windows PC to a new Windows 10 PC quickly and easily. Take a look at the press release and email me your questions or interview requests for ThomasKoll, Laplink CEO.Thank you for your interest in Laplink Software! Connect with Laplink on social media: Twitter // Facebook // LinkedIn
Shireen McCleary
Public Relations Manager
Laplink Software, Inc.
+1 (425) 952-6027

The Everlasting Backup Dilemma

The Problem

Every time a device breaks or a hard drive crashes, we remember the need to back up our data. The majority of us have no current backup. What is worse, we have no backup plan. Today, all of our valuable data – documents, pictures, videos – are scattered over different devices and different backup media. The amount of data we store is growing every day. Gartner predicted that the average storage per household will reach 3.3 terabytes in 2016, of which 64% will be stored locally[i]. With the emergence of mobile devices and the quality of media captured at any moment in our life, data volumes are increasing exponentially.

And yet, we spend little time thinking about how to securely store data: this is part of the everlasting backup dilemma we all face.

Many options to consider.

Business users are very diligent when protecting corporate data. Data is captured on servers which have two sets of safety precautions tied to the operation. Most data servers run with RAID systems which are able to recover the data even if one of the hard drives crashes. Additionally, servers are backed up (often daily) to counteract any server failure. This is too pricey and too complex for any household to try implementing, but the principles should apply anyway: backup and backup the backup!

The easiest way to back up your data is with cloud providers. They offer a vast amount of storage with security built in.

In Windows 10, Microsoft makes it easy to store your data with OneDrive. Google and Apple offer similar services, but for PC users, OneDrive is nicely integrated with your PC. However, as the forecast from Gartner shows, most users will not consider online storage for all their data. Some might not like to have their data in the hands of others, some feel that online data is subject to government snooping, and others just don’t want to keep it locally. Period.

All points make sense; we have to ask ourselves if online storage is “forever”? Will providers shut down unused accounts that are used for longtime storage? Do I always have access to the data?

The majority, however, choose local storage, which means having external or internal hard drives with enough space for us to load the backups or sync our data. There is nothing wrong with it, but we have to remember: backup the backup. Hard drives do go down. I remember that my backup external drive broke the very same time as the internal drive. I still believe it was some kind of power surge. Some heavy data users in a household have a separate data server which will need to be backed up as well.

Another good option is DVD storage. Common DVDs hold 4.7 GB of data; that is a lot of space for documents and pictures, but not for movies or high resolutions graphics.  Blu-ray disc provide storage capacity up to 100 GB of data.

With the availability of inexpensive high capacity hard drives at about $ 50 per terabyte, we have dismissed the good old CD. They are easier to manage, but – and this is a big but – hard drives do break.

Organization is key.

No matter what medium we choose, organization is key. With so much data being collected, we have to organize our data in order to find it again. And that is another problem with online data storage, where folders grow out of control, or we collect hard drives as much as the data itself. How do we ever want to find the right data? (Granted, the search tools are wonderful these days and they do find a lot of stuff fast.)

However, with more data, we have to create a good system of what to store, how to store it, and how to retrieve it.  Since everyone likes their own system, it is hard to prescribe the perfect system. I do like to back up my PCs at a certain time and archive the image. Backing up your whole PC will also preserve your applications, which might be necessary to run to interpret the data.  I also recommend a backup of all external drives periodically.

A new and innovative local storage solution.

Recently I got re-introduced to M-Disc, a long term storage solution that is both secure and very long-lasting. M-Disc is a new kind of DVD and Blu-ray disc, which lasts basically forever and is a perfect medium for storage. Capacity is the same at 4.7GB (DVD), 25 GB (Blue-ray) and 100GB (Blue-ray), although the lifetime has been extended tenfold.

With M-Disc, you can have a secure and long-lasting archive of your data, your PC images and the various libraries you wish to keep. They are local and can be stored in any place (i.e. your bank vault).

Even if the initial costs of having an M-Disc compatible drive and the discs might be a touch higher, it is a cheaper solution for the long run. Check out and learn about this innovative approach.

Ashampoo ( and Nero ( are two companies who embraced this new technology with their burning software.

[i] “Forecast: Consumer Digital Storage Needs, 2010-2016.” The report is available on Gartner’s website here.

Tips for Transferring Files to Windows 10

Moving to a new PC is quite a challenge as Windows 10 has no tools to accomplish this task. For many users, getting their data files such as photos, videos, music, email, contacts, spreadsheets, documents, etc. to their new PC is a major concern and may even result in the delay of purchasing a new PC.

There are four basic options a user can choose from to move data files to a new PC:

1. Upload files from the old PC to cloud storage (Google Drive, OneDrive, Dropbox, etc.) Now the user can easily access these files from anywhere and download the files to their new PC. But if the user has a lot of data, the upload will take a very long time – and, their data might exceed available storage.
2. Transfer using a USB stick or external hard drive.
3. Transfer across a network user Explorer by sharing the old hard drive to the new PC.
4. Use a file transfer utility.

The key problem to all of the above options is that the user must know what they desire to transfer, must know where the data is located on the old PC, and must manage the process. The secondary problem is that there’s a good chance the user really wants more than just data files which they might not realize. A typical user will miss quite a bit of data – perhaps they leave behind their Outlook data, files they accidentally saved in an unusual location, data related to a specific application that was saved in the application’s folder (such as tax files), Internet favorites, shortcuts, and much more.

Laplink offers a better option. PCmover Professional is the only software that can selectively move programs, files and settings from an old Windows PC to a new PC. It’s fast, easy, and powerful.


  • Simply install PCmover on both of the computers and follow the simple wizard to transfer everything desired to the new PC.
  • Users don’t need to know where the location of their files; PCmover knows and will find and transfer all files a user wants regardless of where they were saved.
  • PCmover transfers more than just data files. It also automatically transfers all selected programs and settings. And programs are transferred ready to use on the new PC so a user doesn’t need to reinstall them or find old CDs or license keys.
  • PCmover transfers using any home or business network (wired or wireless) or using a direct-connect (Laplink High Speed Transfer Cable.
  • Once a user completes the short wizard, they walk away and PCmover does the rest.
  • Laplink also provides free 24/7 transfer assistance from certified PC migration experts who will guide the user through the transfer over the phone or by remote control.
  • Laplink also offers PCmover Enterprise which leverages the PCmover technology to allows IT departments to easily set up and manage controlled PC deployment projects for one thousand to hundreds of thousands of PCs. Organizations using PCmover Enterprise typically save over $300 per PC deployed by reducing deployment labor, post-migration support and help desk calls, as well as user down time – and end user satisfaction is higher.
  • If a user is certain they only want to copy data files, Laplink Sync is an easy and powerful solution that will transfer files between PCs, Macs, Android and iOS devices utilizing a 3-step wizard. Files are transferred directly between devices to protect privacy (i.e., no copies exist in cloud storage). Laplink Sync can be used to transfer files or to keep files synchronized between devices.