PCmover Business – The Recommended PC Migration Software for SMB

PCmover Business v11 is now available! PCmover, the top-selling PC migration software, is the only software of its kind recommended by Microsoft & Intel.

New Version of PCmover for Business and IT Professionals

Now Available: PCmover Business Version 11!

We pleased to announce the release of our newest version of PCmover Business. PCmover, the top-selling PC migration software, is the only software of its kind recommended by Microsoft, Intel, and major PC manufacturers.

PC Migration Software for Business & IT Professionals

PCmover Business provides small to medium-sized organizations advanced migration options to greatly reduce the time to deploy PCs. This PC migration software dramatically lowers the cost of a PC refresh project. Furthermore, it becomes particularly valuable when considering Microsoft’s Windows 7 End of Support on January 14, 2020. As Laplink CEO Thomas Koll stresses, “…it is even more imperative we make PCmover available to organizations needing to quickly and efficiently move off Windows 7.”

PCmover Business automatically transfers everything desired from an old PC to a new PC, even applications, while allowing full selectivity. Run PCmover directly from the command line, portable storage devices (such as USB drives), or from a network location. “Simply, we reduce the total cost of deploying a new PC by over $300 on average,” shared Koll. “We save hours of IT labor and reduce end-user frustration. That means lower cost and greater productivity. And for service providers, it means better margins and happier clients.”

Updates & Improvements in Version 11

This latest version of PCmover includes many improvements that resulted from our partnership with Intel. They include auto-connecting between PCs, improved application processing, and a streamlined user interface. Also, users will see increased network transfer speeds, and improved reliability. Likewise, transfer speeds are increased with added support of USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt cables.

Labor costs, especially for IT personnel, keep increasing, but PCmover actually reduces those costs,” continued Koll. “That’s why so many Fortune 100 companies have chosen PCmover – same as the global system integrators who serve those companies, and same for the top consulting firms in the world. It’s why thousands of smaller organizations, from manufacturing to healthcare to education to government all are using PCmover – to lower the total cost of PC refresh.”

Visit the PCmover Business homepage to request the free evaluation, learn more, and view options to purchase, including significant discounts on volume licenses.

 

The Recommended Windows 7 EOS Migration Solution

Windows 7 EOS (End of Support) is January 14, 2020. What's you plan for when Microsoft stops security updates, bug fixes, and support altogether?

PCmover: the Recommended Windows 7 EOS Migration Solution

Are you ready for Windows 7 EOS?

The End of Support (EOS) of Microsoft’s Window 7 is quickly approaching. Starting January 14, 2020, Microsoft will no longer release security updates or bug fixes, discontinuing support altogether. Earlier this month, Laplink CEO Thomas Koll shared his thoughts on the upcoming Windows 7 EOS, and the value of a solution like PCmover. Do you have a plan?

Migration Hesitation

Ending support of the 2nd-most used OS is significant, as it will impact the 485 million PCs still running Windows 7. This is leaving organizations with an immense migration effort on their hands. Some organizations have already started the migration process, but there are still many who find themselves procrastinating their move. This can be due to the lack of a clear solution, a lack of IT manpower, or any number of other questions & pain points.

That’s where PCmover comes in.

Migration Pain Points & FAQs

What happens with the user’s data?

Perhaps the most common concern when migrating is ensuring you have moved everything. Do you know the location of every file needing to be transferred? What if you miss a critical file? Additionally, do you have a clear sense of how much data, business critical or not, needs to be moved per user profile? The simplicity of PCmover is a huge benefit because it will make a complete analysis of the PC and find all necessary files, as well as files in hidden folders.

What’s the scope of my migration project?

On top of the migration itself, migration setup can be a challenge. Every PC is different, with varying sizes, types, and locations of data. PCmover helps with all of this. You can transfer everything just to be safe, or choose certain apps, folders, or file types. You’ll have a clear sense of what you’re transferring, and how much space you’ll need on the other side.

Are my apps compatible with Windows 10?

Do you have a smart enough tool to decide compatibility on the fly? PCmover can select certain apps, or blacklist others to ensure compatibility with Windows 10.

How can I minimize migration downtime?

There’s not only the impact on IT staff to handle the migration effort. Each minute a user is without their PC is downtime eating into the bottom line. Sure, there’s the option to speed through manual migrations to save time. However, incomplete migrations result in user dissatisfaction, additional help desk calls, and even more downtime. Using PCmover ultimately reduces migration time, thus minimizing critical employee downtime.

… we have seen a large savings in time spent by users (worker downtime during migrations) as well as a drop in help desk calls related to the transfer process, allowing for savings in staffing.”
– Global Professional & Financial Services Firm, Project Manager


Is there a simple and effective Windows 7 EOS migration solution?

You’ve hopefully guessed it by now. PCmover offers a simple, efficient, and effective way to both setup migrations, and conduct the migrations themselves, all while saving time and reducing costs and downtime.

Can I stay on Windows 7?

Still, some may feel this is all too much of a hassle. Others may not have the IT resources to support a migration to Windows 10.

“What if I just take the risk and stay on Windows 7?” Security Boulevard provided 32 security reasons to move to Windows 10. Inaction should not be considered a viable option, especially for SMBs & Enterprises organizations.

The ONLY recommended Windows 7 EOS migration solution

It’s clear the best course of action is to migrate. Organizations need to be prepared, and ensure they have a strategy to avoid last-minute scrambling and security risks. For the simplest, most efficient and effective way, go with the only migration solution recommended by both Microsoft and Intel.

Visit our Windows 7 End of Support page to learn more and request a FREE DEMO of PCmover Enterprise.
PCmover: Microsoft Recommended Windows 7 EOS Migration SolutionPCmover: Intel's Recommended Windows 7 EOS Migration Solution

Series: 5 Tips for Software Developers (Part 2)

Jack Wilson, Laplink Software’s Chief Technology Officer, has 30 years of experience in a wide variety of software development projects and is a seasoned software developer. He has extensive experience developing network devices and network-enabled applications. Jack’s professional skills were honed at leading companies, including Networks Northwest Inc., Boeing Defense and Space Group, and Westinghouse.

As the manager for the tech department at Laplink, Jack expounds on his 5 tips for software developers he would give to interested parties applying to work on his team. This is the second post of the series, so stay tuned for the last post.

TIP 2: Always think about what will make something better.

If you come up with something and you find out someone has already done it, then see if you can do it better. If no one has, then do it! There have been many companies that were started by someone who just found a better way of doing something, and they were the ones to succeed. The most fun I ever had in my career was working at a small startup; I was the fifth employee. We worked hard and created a great product. Unfortunately, we were unable to get our costs down to a competitive level and so the company ultimately failed. However, even though the company didn’t succeed, it was still a great time and a really great learning experience.

Having tunnel vision in your field can be debilitating for your future as a software developer. It’s always important to stay abreast of your competitive landscape from a product perspective. Because you want to make sure that your product is better than everyone else’s. Communicate regularly with your team’s project manager to better understand what your competition is doing, and see if you can’t make it better.

TIP 3: Software is not only limited to the PC, Mac, or tablet.

Software is now in everything and will keep growing immensely. Another misconception is that everything has a screen; more and more, screenless devices are part of the Internet of Things. My advice is to learn to do embedded software; it can be a real challenge. Pick up a Raspberry Pi or Arduino and play with it for a while just to see what you can learn. It will help you when you’re applying for software developer and programmer jobs.

But be wary whatever the new fad is. Engineers love to play with whatever is the new thing, which is okay as long as it is the right solution for the job. Otherwise, you are wasting time and money for your company, yourself.

Stay tuned for the final post in this series!

Series: 5 Tips for Software Developers

With the rapid evolution of technology, the demand for software developers and engineers is growing. Software has woven itself tightly into daily lives; programmers and developers have almost guaranteed job security.

The job outlook for software developers in 2012, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, is growing at a rate of 22%: faster than the average career. With an undergrad degree and computer programming skills, college grads are hired out of school earning a much higher starting salary than almost any other profession that does not require more than a BA.

But while this is an exciting time to study software development, young graduates and newcomers to the industry might lose sight of their goals, or get lost in the shiny haze of new opportunities that are coming at them as fast as technology is changing.

Jack Wilson, Laplink Software’s Chief Technology Officer, has 30 years of experience in a wide variety of software development projects from radar and air defense systems to commercial software. He is a seasoned software developer and has extensive experience developing network devices and network-enabled applications. Jack’s professional skills were honed at leading companies, including Networks Northwest Inc., Boeing Defense and Space Group, and Westinghouse.

As the manager for the tech department at Laplink, Jack expounds on his 5 tips for software developers he would give to interested parties applying to work on his team. This series will be broken into 3 posts, so stay tuned for the next two posts, also.

TIP 1: Don’t just get into something just because it’s the “in” thing.

Get into something that you can be truly passionate about. In the late 1990’s everyone who could spell “www” got jobs creating web pages. By 2001 most of them lost their jobs, except those who were passionate. They became even better. Something that has vastly advanced in the last 20 years is the Internet. I remember telling one of my engineers back in the early 1990s to go get this Mozilla browser thing and look into what this World Wide Web “thing” was all about. In those days, smaller companies had networks running Novell Netware. The really big companies networks ran Digital’s DecNet on mainframes. (Those networks don’t even exist anymore.) Companies connected offices to each other using state-of-the-art “modems” sending about 300 bits per second.

To give you an idea of how slow that is by current standards, my home Internet today is connected at 50 Mega-bits per second: it is 166,666 times faster than what we used in the nineties, and I still complain that the Internet is slow!