Trash Talk

Let’s discuss trash for a moment. A by-product of human existence, our trash never really goes away. Sure, some of it might biodegrade into the soil, but most of it, unfortunately, just hangs out. Your digital refuse isn’t much different – the files and folders you “delete” or toss in the Recycle Bin don’t actually disappear from your computer, just like the old newspaper you throw in the garbage doesn’t disappear from the planet.

The only difference between your physical trash and your digital trash is in what’s being thrown away. Think about it: most people are not going to be interested in tracking down and retrieving an empty jar of peanut butter or burnt-out light bulb, but those old excel documents of financial information that you “deleted” from your computer before throwing it away or selling it might have a bit more appeal.

Fortunately, there is software available to address this problem. Programs like Laplink SafeErase serve to securely delete whatever data you choose from hard drives, ensuring that your digital trash is protected from those who would pick through it. But what is it that these kinds of programs do that you can’t do yourself? Why is a piece of software like SafeErase so critical to wiping files off of your computer? Well, we’re glad you asked.

Continue reading

Demystifying The Disk Image

There is little that rivals the mystique of disk imaging. If you perform an internet search of the term “disk imaging,” you’ll find that though imaging products may be large in number, there is very little information available on how they work.

Is it the fate, then, of PC users everywhere to remain in the dark, ceaselessly wondering just how products like Laplink DiskImage, Acronis True Image and Norton Ghost magically create images of their PC, which they may save for later restoration?

Nay.

After scouring the internet and picking the brains of Laplink’s finest software engineers, this Laplink copywriter has put together an explanation of the disk imaging process and publishes it now, here on this very blog, to spread the purifying light of knowledge to the far reaches of the PC user community.

Unveiling a Mystery: The Disk Imaging Process

A disk image, as it turns out, is just that – an image of your hard drive. It is a single file containing the entire contents of a data storage device, such as a hard drive, optical drive, etc., ending in a .dmg, .iso, .cue, .bin or .img file extension. This file can be stored either a compressed state, to save space, or a “raw,” uncompressed state. Whether the file of a disk image is compressed, along with the size of the hard drive, determines how large the file will be. Images that appear as a separate hard drive to the computer are called virtual hard drives, and end in .vhd.

Continue reading