PCmover migration: PC to PC

PCmover Professional and Business support three migration scenarios:

Scenario 1: Migrate to a New Machine

  • Direct peer-to peer transfer over cable or network
  • File-based transfer using storage device

Scenario 2: Upgrade an old Windows PC to Windows 10

  • Custom Windows 10 install
  • Reformatted Windows 10 install

Scenario 3: Recover directly from a hard drive or VHD

  • Physical drive restoration
  • Image file restoration (mounted as VHD)

The first scenario is the most common scenario where you deploy to a new PC and replace an existing desktop, moving the data, settings and applications from the old to the new PC through the network. Some companies prefer a USB cable to reduce the traffic on the network or for offline migrations.

PCmover® Professional and Business editions make the migration process effective and cost-efficient. PCmover is an OS-independent transfer tool that allows users to migrate from Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, and 8.1 to Windows 10. PCmover transfers all selected applications, data, and settings to a new PC, including user accounts, applications’ environments, applications’ add-ons, background pictures, favorites, and more.

You can watch a PCmover tutorial video here.

In our next post, we will talk about PCmover’s second supported migration scenario.

Replacing desktop PCs with a desktop

With the upcoming release of Windows 10, Microsoft’s newest operating system is expected to become the new standard for corporate and organizational computing. Windows 10 is being built to accommodate all the business users who reluctantly stayed on Windows 7 after the end of support for XP, despite the availability of the 8 and 8.1 versions.

Research shows that Windows 8 and 8.1 only gained a 15% market share, leaving 85% of PCs worldwide still running Windows versions XP, Vista, and 7. While home consumers will be able to easily upgrade to Windows 10 at an affordable cost later this year, professional organizations will need to refresh their aging PC infrastructure, in addition to their operating systems. This event will likely mark the largest upgrade project since the launch of the first PC.

IT pros are not replacing desktops with laptops.

 
Some 45 percent of IT professionals plan to replace a desktop with a desktop, while only 12 percent plan to replace a desktop with a laptop.

Whether it’s a home business owner managing a single PC, or an organization running 100 PCs, the business opportunity as a service provider and reseller is available.

A corporate migration will push resources and budgets beyond their limits, unless deployment processes are redefined.

While PC deployments have been a top consideration for many IT departments, there are few standard processes in place to make it an effective procedure while maintaining workplace productivity. Despite advances in software and technology, it remains true that few solutions are known of in the industry that can successfully migrate applications, data, and settings to a new PC.

At Laplink we offer PCmover Professional and Business editions to make the migration process effective and cost-efficient for IT service providers and software resellers in this market. PCmover is an OS-independent transfer tool that allows users to migrate from Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, and 8.1 to Windows 10. PCmover transfers all selected applications, data, and settings to a new PC, including user accounts, applications’ environments, applications’ add-ons, background pictures, favorites, and more.

PCmover Professional and Business support all migration scenarios.

Software giveaway for Laplink’s 32nd anniversary!

Laplink celebrates its 32nd anniversary with 24 hours of incredible software giveaways through June 18 (8:30 AM PST). The rest of June, Laplink will have a bundle of fantastic software promotions available at http://www.laplink.com/happy32nd for everyone that is ready to upgrade or migrate to Windows 10 when it’s available next month!

IT Pros prefer PCs in 2015

According to The SHI Blog in January 2015: “Reports of the PC’s death have been greatly exaggerated,” said author Ed McNamara in his blog article. “Written off after a slow 2013, PCs fought back last year with sales growing 1 percent in the fourth quarter year over year.”

The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) earlier in 2015 also boosted hype for the previously downturned market: new advances in hardware such as hybrid laptop/tablets, curved screens, and ultra-thin laptops were showcased to a receptive audience. “Clearly PCs aren’t down for the count just yet,” wrote McNamara.

So what does this mean for the migration software market and those in the industry going forward this year?

IT Pros prefer PCs in 2015.

“Of the 99 percent of IT professionals whose organizations plan to replace at least one computer next year, 82 percent will replace existing desktops or laptops with another desktop or laptop,” said McNamara.

As the economy continues to improve, business professionals will begin updating their computer’s hardware and operating systems for the first time in years. These events will provide a considerable business and financial opportunity for software sales and IT services for professional users requiring a secure migration of their files, folders, user settings, and applications from PC to PC.

If you are a software reseller, consider joining the Laplink Partner Program and reselling PCmover Professional to IT pros ready to migrate and upgrade to Windows 10 this year.

Getting to Windows 10

Of the greater than 100 different ways to move to Windows 10 from Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, and 8.1, less than 20 are allowed by Microsoft to implement an in-place upgrade.

This means that very few of the scenarios keep your applications, data and settings “in-place”– in other words, still installed on your computer, and in the same location as before.

The debut of Windows 10 is likely to have the effect of increasing the demand for PCs with a mouse and keyboard. Yet even in mature regions, which are actually strong markets such as the United States, PC sales are still expected to drop by 5.1 percent this year, despite the arrival of Windows 10. Microsoft’s announcement that upgrades to Windows 10 would be free for the first year for all Windows 7, 8, and 8.1 users also likely had the effecet of discouraging new PC sales. With such an easy option to upgrade directly to the new OS without updating hardware, the first year of the Windows 10 release is likely not going to see huge jumps in new PC sales.

One challenge will remain for users upgrading to Windows 10 for free: while there are many ways to migrate data and applications PC to PC, few scenarios actually support an in-place upgrade without erasing the old data, or overwriting the new OS. For any remaining Windows XP users, all Windows Vista users, any 32-bit Windows 7 users, and any users remaining on Windows 8, they cannot easily upgrade to the new OS without purchasing third party software.

While users of 64-bit Windows 7 and users of Windows 8.1 will have a comparatively easier time, it still won’t be a straightforward process.

All other scenarios require a “clean install” of Windows which can be done either by reformatting the hard drive or by “over-installing” the new operating system. Both cases result in the applications, data, and settings being moved to different directories and the applications are not registered with the new OS.

If you want to know how to complete an in-place upgrade to Windows 10 with Laplink’s PCmover software, watch this video here.

PCmover Supports Migrations to Windows 10

Laplink is continuing its previous, successful relationship with Microsoft. Together Laplink and Microsoft are collaborating to ensure that PCmover users have a great experience when using PCmover in an upgrade scenario. From what we understand (and have tested) right now, it’s safe to say that PCmover will support migrations to the following editions of Windows 10:

  • Windows 10 Home
  • Windows 10 Pro
  • Windows 10 Enterprise
  • Windows 10 Education

The easiest way to enjoy the latest Windows release would, of course, be to buy a new PC loaded with the new OS and to use PCmover Professional to migrate all the applications, data, and settings from your old PC to this new PC. But PCmover also supports in-place upgrades to Windows 10, and transfers all the old OS’s files, settings, profiles, and applications without overwriting the new operating system.

For standard hardware refreshes and as-needed PC replacements, PCmover can operate across a corporate network, cross-over Ethernet cable, Laplink USB cable, or a portable storage device, offering a flexible, time-saving and simple solution for automating the end-to-end process.

Microsoft’s Windows 10 Editions

Microsoft released information about the seven versions of Windows 10 it will offer in a blog post on June 1. Here are the key takeaway points:

  1. Windows 10 Home will be the version used by consumers on PCs and larger tablets, the focus here will be more so on retail.
  2. Windows 10 Professional is designed to run on desktops, laptops, 2-in-1s and tablets. Additional features in the area of business management and security, this version is aimed at users who will have a machine supplied by work but might also want to use it for personal tasks. Focus is retail again.
  3. Windows 10 Enterprise is the version targeted at larger businesses, and will be sold through Microsoft’s Volume Licensing program. It adds additional security and management features, and gives administrators control over the pace at which updates are released. There will be some stripped -down versions (embedded use) for devices like POS’s and ATMs.
  4. Windows 10 Education is a tweaked version of Enterprise targeted for the education market (e.g. schools and universities.)
  5. Windows 10 Mobile will run on smartphones and smaller tablets (with a screen size of 9 inches or less). This is the product currently known as Windows Phone.
  6. Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise is a business-focused version of Windows 10 Mobile, also sold via Volume Licensing. Like Enterprise, there will also be a cut-down “industrial” edition for handheld terminals and other task-specific devices.
  7. Windows 10 Internet of Things Core is a very stripped-down version of Windows 10, designed for “small footprint, low cost devices like gateways.” Microsoft has previously indicated this version will be free.

Windows 10 IoT

Windows 10 will release on July 29th this year

It is clear that its release will be to great expectations. Unlike Windows 8, it is anticipated that existing PC users will switch much more rapidly to Windows 10. Here are a number of reasons why:

  • Windows 10 will be more user friendly than Windows 8, including a redesigned Start menu, virtual desktops, and re-sizable Windows Store apps that behave more like legacy apps.
  • Many of the improvements will be especially important to businesses, allowing them to deploy & manage PC’s running Windows 10 more easily and cost efficient than ever.
  • Analyst predict massive conversions from Windows XP, Vista, 7, and even 8/8.1 (supported by the fact that it will be free for Win 7 and Win 8/8.1 users.)

PC users ready to migrate or upgrade to the newest operating system by Microsoft should consider Laplink’s PCmover software to complete this upgrade quickly and easily.

Move to Windows 10 Technical Preview Free

Are you testing out Windows 10 Technical Preview? Good news! Laplink is offering PCmover Express for free!

windows 10 technical preview

Just like in Windows 8.1, Windows 10 Technical Preview doesn’t support a variety of migration scenarios. As a partner with and supporter of Microsoft, Laplink is cooperating with Microsoft to make using Windows 10 Technical Preview as easy and productive as possible.

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New Internet Explorer Bug Exposed – Laplink Helps Vulnerable XP Users

IEBug

A new vulnerability affecting Internet Explorer 6 through 11 users was discovered just this past weekend. The bug can grant hackers access to a PC, likely allowing them to install programs, create accounts, and view, change, or delete user data. It has already been exploited against U.S. financial and defense companies, resulting in the U.S. government issuing a strong warning about the risks of using these versions of Internet Explorer.

Microsoft is aware of the problem and is working on a patch. However, since support for Windows XP ended earlier this month, those who still using Windows XP are out of luck.

This bug is just the first in what could be a long list of vulnerabilities that will remain open for hackers, viruses, and malware to target XP users. It’s also a clear indication that the end of support doesn’t only affect the operating system, but other applications like browsers, too. Continue reading